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Lansing Bicentennial Minutes

By Louise Bement
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Lansing Bicentennial MinuteAbout 1880 Dick Howell built a boat, the 'Clayton', with M.E. Sperry. They bought the complete set of patterns from a man in Geneva. "We just laid them on the timber and cut out the pieces", Dick explained.  It took all winter to build it on the beach at Ladoga Park near Myers. Reynolds and Lang in Ithaca built the machinery for the 'Clayton' which Dick ran for about ten years.
By Louise Bement
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Lansing Bicentennial MinuteSome of the boys who left Lansing to fight in World War II in 1941 are: Aub Cratsley,Jr., Don Wagner, Jim Hercinger, Mike Saleem, Jess Solomon, George Issac, Al Kastenboder, Bill Minturn, Bob Cratsley, Bud Holden, Ed Kowalski. They are pictured in front of The Corner Cupboard as they wait for the bus to take them to the camp where they would be given physicals and be inducted into service for their country.
By Louise Bement
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Lansing Bicentennial MinuteAlgerine Road was probably named for an Algerine, or one who acted 'like an Algerine pirate', referring to the Barbary pirates from Algiers on Africa's North Coast. The use of this term in Lansing surely implied that the people living on Algerine Road were thought to act illegally. Before the road took the name Algerine, it was known as Cooney.
By Louise Bement
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Lansing Bicentennial MinuteThe N.N.P. Lyceum, a study group in Lansing, presented a program January 6, 1869 on the resolution "That the right of suffrage should be extended to women." After an interesting debate, listened to by an appreciative audience, the judges decided that "woman now occupied her proper sphere." This decision brought a fiery criticism from Mary A. Wager, a newspaper writer  from New York City. She described herself as being a "Tompkins County Child" as she had been born on Algerine Road.  She said, "It is a pity that that humble village could not be scooped up out of the hollow in which it grovels and be set upon a hill where the sunlight of progress and common sense could vitalize it."
By Louise Bement
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Lansing Bicentennial MinuteThrough thick and thin, winter cold and summer heat, Everett V. Nobles for 42 years carried rural mail out of the Ludlowville Post Office until December 1, 1955, when he retired. He had seen his route grow from 20 miles in 1913 to 68 miles at his retirement. In 1953, when additions were added to his route, he covered more miles than any other carrier in the state. He estimated he traveled a total of some 650,000 miles, leaving mail at 350 roadside boxes. He started his rounds with horses and even after he got a car in 1914, he relied on his horses during the winter months.
By Louise Bement
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Lansing Bicentennial MinuteLansingville was first known as Teetertown, named after Conrad Teeter who came here around 1807 to join his brother, Peter Teeter, who came in 1795. Conrad had tavern there which made it a 'town center'. When the tavern was sold in 1828, the name was changed to Lansingville.  The first Teeter to arrive here was Henry Teeter who came in 1791. He also built a tavern, but it burned in the spring of 1804. His wife was consumed in the flames and Henry died about six months later from injuries sustained in the fire.

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