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Lansing Bicentennial Minutes

By Louise Bement
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Lansing Bicentennial MinuteThe Civil War veterans sometimes had to wait a long time to get their pensions so their back pay reached big sums. John Murphy went to Ithaca to cash his check and demanded it all in gold. He returned to Ludlowville with gold in every pocket and rather full of liquor. He showed it in the store, was finally persuaded to go home, having to go to Sulfur Springs by Red Bridge and along the creek bank and through the fields. Veterans stood by each other, so Bill Price, on hearing about it, fearing for his safety, got a lantern and followed John. That was easy as there was snow on the ground. Arriving at John's log cabin, he found John had reached it safely.
By Louise Bement
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Lansing Bicentennial MinuteMartin Murphy's daughters, Nancy, Mary, and Sally, earned money to build a frame house near the log cabin, but Martin said he had lived for years in the log cabin and it was good enough for him. So he stayed the rest of his life there, while his family moved into the new home. Martin Murphy and his sons, Jim, Ed, and John dug out a road in Ludlowville using pick, shovel, and wheelbarrow. They took contract for $500. Before that Tile Yard Hill, Cemetery Hill, and Dug Road were the only roads in Ludlowville.
By Louise Bement
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Lansing Bicentennial MinuteAlbert Slocum owned the old Strong farm three miles up Salmon Creek Road in Ludlowville. At the auction following his death (1896), several men stood on top of a big cistern to see better. The top broke and the men had to be pulled from the icy water. Slocum's wife was Rozanna Townley who died in 1892. Originally from Newark, the Townley family came to Lansing in 1788 from the Wyoming Valley in Pennsylvania. When a company of French immigrants offered high prices in gold for all the valley land, the brothers sold out and came to Lansing. The land that they sold in Pennsylvania was planned to become an Asylum for Marie Antoinette, and her son, the Dauphin. But they were killed by the French Revolutionaries and never arrived here.
By Louise Bement
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Lansing Bicentennial MinuteNear Genoa there was a saw mill with a vertical saw. On one occasion the miller that operated this saw mill was eating his lunch when a passing bear caught scent of food. The bear came in the mill and was fascinated by the moving saw. He went to the saw, hugged it, and was cut in half.
By Louise Bement
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Lansing Bicentennial MinuteThe Town of Lansing, formed in 1817, was originally part of the larger Town of Milton. Then the name was changed to Town of Genoa in 1808. One of the final resolutions of the Old Town of Genoa came in 1816 when a "Certificate of Freedom" was granted to one Issac Middleton, a person colored, about 40 years of age. He was a free man as he was born free in Salem, Massachusetts.
By Louise Bement
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Lansing Bicentennial MinuteSouth Lansing, January 12, 1924: Wednesday was a memorable day for the Grangers of this vicinity, when the mortgage of their hall was burned, a sumptuous dinner was served, and officers for 1924 were installed. The building was fully equipped by the women of the Grange, who sold ice cream and baked goods, and who later sold sandwiches and coffee to purchase the gasoline lamps now used on both floors. This Grange building is our present Community Building.