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posticon Salmon Creek Bridge Work Delayed For A Year

News | Friday, May 25, 2018 | By Dan Veaner Print
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Salmon Creek Bridge


Just over a year ago the New York State Department of Transportation (DOT) told Lansing residents at an informational meeting that the Salmon Creek Bridge west of the Lansing schools on Route 34B would be closed for much of 2019. DOT officials said the the 87 year old bridge would be demolished and entirely replaced with a new design. This month Lansing Supervisor Ed LaVigne received a letter from DOT Regional Design Engineer George A. Doucette informing him that work on the bridge will likely be postponed for a year.

"Unforeseen delays due to the need for additional environmental studies has led us to revise the project schedule," Doucette wrote. "We are now looking at bid opening in fall of 2020. The construction phase woud be ready to start early in 2021."

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posticon Comprehensive Plan Approved -- Now What?

News | Friday, May 25, 2018 | By Dan Veaner Print
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Comprehensive Plan Approved -- Now What?

The adopted Lansing Comprehensive Plan revision and all accompanying documents are available at the Lansing Town Hall and on the Town Web site.
When Connie Wilcox was appointed chair of the Comprehensive Plan Committee in January of 2016 her stated goal was to get a draft of the Comprehensive Plan revision the Town Board could approve by some time in the fall of that year.  A nearly year-long review of that draft by the Planning Board set that goal back, and then a last minute public push to change parts of the Planning Board version added about four months to the process some Town Board members hoped could be completed last December.  In all, it took over six years -- work on the revision began in 2012 -- before the Lansing Town Board adopted a final draft of the revision.  Many citizens expressed worry that what was written in the plan was 'written in stone'.  Wilcox and Town officials insisted that it is simply a guide for future development, zoning, and would be used as a rough template to craft most townspeople's vision for the next decade.  So now that the plan has been adopted, what's next?

"Probably the biggest reason you do a comprehensive plan is so you can update your land use (zoning) ordinance," says Lansing planning Consultant Michael H. Long. "That's probably the next big step in terms of the Town of Lansing."

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posticon Nearly $830,000 in Funding Supporting Local Solar Projects

News | Friday, May 25, 2018 | By NY State Governor's Office Print
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Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced Wednesday that 2,439 solar projects have been installed or are in development in communities throughout New York. These projects are part of locally-organized campaigns supported through the NY-Sun Solarize Initiative. Solarize is a vital component of Cuomo's Clean Energy Standard, which requires that half of New York's electricity come from renewable sources by 2030.

"New York leads the nation in advancing aggressive clean energy policies and by supporting local projects across the state, our communities are realizing the benefits," Cuomo said. "Solarize campaigns are bringing renewable energy to residents and businesses at an affordable price while providing resiliency to the electric grid to ensure a cleaner, greener New York for all."

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posticon Cuomo Issues Pardons Restoring The Right To Vote

News | Friday, May 25, 2018 | By New York State Governor's Office Print
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Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced Tuesday that he has issued the first set of conditional pardons restoring the right to vote to 24,086 people under community supervision in New York State. Building on the Governor's sweeping criminal justice reforms, this group of pardons follows the Executive Order signed on April 18 to improve civic engagement and reduce recidivism. New York State Election law provides that a Governor's pardon restores the right to vote to individuals who lose this right due to being on parole for a felony that resulted in their incarceration.

"The right to vote is fundamental and it is unconscionable to deny that basic right of citizenship to New Yorkers who have paid their debt to society," Governor Cuomo said. "Restoring a voice to men and women reentering their communities will strengthen our democracy, as well as the reentry process, which in-turn will help reduce recidivism."

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posticon $17.8 Million To Combat Violent Crime And Shootings Across New York State

News | Friday, May 25, 2018 | By New York State Governor's Office Print
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Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced more than $17.8 million to fund the Gun Involved Violence Elimination (GIVE) initiative and SNUG, New York's street outreach program - both of which received national recognition for employing an evidence-based approach toward reducing gun violence. The 17 counties and 20 law enforcement agencies participating in the GIVE initiative will share $13.3 million of the funding, while the 11 SNUG sites throughout the state will share $4.5 million. This funding will allow communities to build on the work supported by GIVE and SNUG, which helped them significantly reduce gun violence and homicides in 2017.

"By investing in evidence-based practices with a proven record of success, New York is committed to combatting gun violence in every corner of this great state," Governor Cuomo said. "From enacting the strongest gun safety laws in the nation to supporting these crucial programs, this administration is doing everything in its power to combat gun crime and protect New Yorkers."

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posticon Bill Tackles Student Loan Debt For Working-Class Students

News | Friday, May 25, 2018 | By Office of Congressman Tom Reed Print
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Washington, DC - Rep. Tom Reed (R-NY) introduced the Reducing Excessive Debt and Unfair Costs of Education (REDUCE) Act Tuesday to encourage universities to lower costs for all eligible students, regardless of their economic background.  The REDUCE Act also increases transparency in how colleges are spending their money to encourage public pressure on universities to lower the cost of education that has students drowning in debt.

"We should care about the working-class students who are being taken advantage of by the unfair costs of college," said Reed. "In most cases, the richer the school, the smaller the percentage of working class students being served by the college. We currently give these schools huge tax breaks and subsidies, and it is time they start serving the working-class taxpayer who supports them."

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